Tandem Felix revealed their new single ‘Ryan Hoguet’/’How Strange, The Weather’ on Sunday. It followed the release of the Popcorn EP in April, which drew widespread plaudits. They seem more confident on ‘Ryan Hoguet’, a song that finds the Dublin four piece in no rush whatsoever. It’s built around the refrain, “can we stay with you a while? From a thousand miles away, can we stay?” A slowly evolving four and a half minutes, it actually makes sense hearing the track on a Sunday. The verbose second track comes in on Elliot Smith vibes before taking a turn for Radiohead territory. They employ silence, echoed laughter and a distant, simple guitar line to woo the listener. And it works, too. David Tapley says the songs are inspired by the time he spent in the US in summer 2012. ‘Ryan Hoguet’ is “an ode to a kind man I befriended in San Francisco”, while ‘How Strange, The Weather’ is a song “about struggling with and overcoming a creative slump. Tandem Felix, completed by Evan Keogh, Fiachra Kinder and Conor Muldowney, launch the single at the Button Factory on Wednesday, December 11. Support comes from Other Creatures. Released on Trout Records, you can download the single for €2 at Tandem Felix’s Bandcamp page, or order it on 7″ for €7. There’s a little more info from David about the songs after the jump.


“Unlike our first EP, Popcorn, which we recorded all together in the comfort of a studio with a well-stocked arsenal, these new songs were recorded mostly alone at my family home, with very minimal equipment and instrumentation. We approached the recording in a completely different way too. Most of the instrumentation was recorded by myself (since the bass guitar parts were stolen away from him, Evan was forced to make his backing-vocal debut). The drums were recorded as an improvisation, then chopped up and looped to add to this minimal fashion. Since it is our first time to print on vinyl, I wanted to do something different. Each one of the 250 records comes with a hand-painted sleeve by Dublin artist Salvatore Fullam. From number 1 to 250, the cover art shifts and changes as the colour palette evolves and the style becomes more practised and comfortable. Each record stands alone as an embodiment of the time and effort spent by both songwriter and painter.”